Photo

Jul 29, 2014
@ 5:40 pm
Permalink

This infographic comes from Wax and Wane: The Tough Realities of Vinyl’s Comeback. The whole article was fascinating, and not just for nuggets like this, which places Bob Marley’s perennial pre-teen exploration beyond current pop, 1984’s Legend, alongside rock acts big and small. (And of course the biggest of them all, The Beatles.)

The top 50 year-to-date vinyl albums as of June 1 included a mix of indie rock, alt rock, folk rock, and classic rock. So, yes: Vinyl is still very much a rock format. A few hip-hop releases are sprinkled in—Kendrick Lamar’s good kid: m.A.A.d city at #18, Kanye’s The College Dropout at #45, Wu-Tang Clan’s Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) just beyond at #59—but even those are rap albums that have noted indie crossover appeal. Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories makes an appearance, as does Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue, and radio mainstays like Justin Timberlake and Lorde. But the rest is dominated by indie- and alt-rock faves (Vampire Weekend, Mumford & Sons, Arctic Monkeys, Bon Iver, Beck, Neutral Milk Hotel), classic-rock heavyweights (the Beatles, Pink Floyd, Bob Marley), and all three of the most recent albums by the Black Keys, who have managed to corral both indie- and classic-rock fans. The chart reads like a required-listening syllabus for a course in indie rock of the recent past and baby boomer classics.

This is yet more evidence in my theory that the only people buying music anymore are the same ones that only ever bought music, really, save for the height of the CD era in 1999/2000—ones who listen to more than just pop music. Which, even with the decline of radio, are rock fans.
And if I carry this idea to its logical conclusion, it makes sense that rock radio has been falling by the wayside in the last decade; the people that would have listened to it are too busy curating their own musical experience.

This infographic comes from Wax and Wane: The Tough Realities of Vinyl’s Comeback. The whole article was fascinating, and not just for nuggets like this, which places Bob Marley’s perennial pre-teen exploration beyond current pop, 1984’s Legend, alongside rock acts big and small. (And of course the biggest of them all, The Beatles.)

The top 50 year-to-date vinyl albums as of June 1 included a mix of indie rock, alt rock, folk rock, and classic rock. So, yes: Vinyl is still very much a rock format. A few hip-hop releases are sprinkled in—Kendrick Lamar’s good kid: m.A.A.d city at #18, Kanye’s The College Dropout at #45, Wu-Tang Clan’s Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) just beyond at #59—but even those are rap albums that have noted indie crossover appeal. Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories makes an appearance, as does Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue, and radio mainstays like Justin Timberlake and Lorde. But the rest is dominated by indie- and alt-rock faves (Vampire Weekend, Mumford & Sons, Arctic Monkeys, Bon Iver, Beck, Neutral Milk Hotel), classic-rock heavyweights (the Beatles, Pink Floyd, Bob Marley), and all three of the most recent albums by the Black Keys, who have managed to corral both indie- and classic-rock fans. The chart reads like a required-listening syllabus for a course in indie rock of the recent past and baby boomer classics.

This is yet more evidence in my theory that the only people buying music anymore are the same ones that only ever bought music, really, save for the height of the CD era in 1999/2000—ones who listen to more than just pop music. Which, even with the decline of radio, are rock fans.

And if I carry this idea to its logical conclusion, it makes sense that rock radio has been falling by the wayside in the last decade; the people that would have listened to it are too busy curating their own musical experience.

post tags: music consumerism year of reblogs vinyl

Photo

Jul 29, 2014
@ 4:20 pm
Permalink

Marks on the Green Monster: CJ Gunther’s Baseball Graffiti

Super cool. The physics of baseball as art.

Marks on the Green Monster: CJ Gunther’s Baseball Graffiti

Super cool. The physics of baseball as art.

post tags: baseball photography

Video

Jul 28, 2014
@ 5:40 pm
Permalink

comedycentral:

It’s Nathan Fielder’s most grande plan yet. The Dumb Starbucks episode of Nathan For You premieres tomorrow at 10:30/9:30c.

Really excited for this episode.

post tags: Nathan for You comedy television year of reblogs Starbucks Dumb Starbucks