Posts on: music


Video

Aug 18, 2014
@ 5:40 pm
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popculturebrain:

First Listen: Taylor Swift - “Shake It Off”

Weird. I think I like this song.

post tags: music video year of reblogs unexpected turn of events

Photo

Aug 16, 2014
@ 4:20 pm
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Accidents Happen: Britt Daniel on the Songs of Spoon

I remember seeing an old picture of my dad going to work in a dress shirt and tie—it was a look that I didn’t see too much anymore. For “The Fitted Shirt”, I must have asked someone to bring in a harpsichord because of how into the Kinks I was in that moment. I found this website right when online sales of music were starting—maybe it was called CD Universe—but there was a flaw in their system, so as long as I entered a different address every time, I could order a free CD. So I ordered, at various addresses, the entire Kinks catalog. If it wasn’t for that website, Girls Can Tell might have had a different attitude and sound.

I’m sure I considered the Kinks’ influence on Spoon before, but until reading this, it never made so much sense why I love Spoon like I do.
(And yes: I really, really love the Kinks. And, for that matter, “The Fitted Shirt”, easily one of my favorites in the Spoon catalog.)

Accidents Happen: Britt Daniel on the Songs of Spoon

I remember seeing an old picture of my dad going to work in a dress shirt and tie—it was a look that I didn’t see too much anymore. For “The Fitted Shirt”, I must have asked someone to bring in a harpsichord because of how into the Kinks I was in that moment. I found this website right when online sales of music were starting—maybe it was called CD Universe—but there was a flaw in their system, so as long as I entered a different address every time, I could order a free CD. So I ordered, at various addresses, the entire Kinks catalog. If it wasn’t for that website, Girls Can Tell might have had a different attitude and sound.

I’m sure I considered the Kinks’ influence on Spoon before, but until reading this, it never made so much sense why I love Spoon like I do.

(And yes: I really, really love the Kinks. And, for that matter, “The Fitted Shirt”, easily one of my favorites in the Spoon catalog.)

post tags: Spoon music The Kinks reading

Photo

Aug 14, 2014
@ 4:20 pm
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worldcafe:

Ever wonder why you love the music of your teenage years the most? 
Great article from Slate explaining the neural science and social reasons why we all feel the way we do. 

The nostalgia that accompanies our favorite songs isn’t just a fleeting recollection of earlier times; it’s a neurological wormhole that gives us a glimpse into the years when our brains leapt with joy at the music that’s come to define us.


I like everything about this except for the part where no one talks about how during those years you haven’t yet been exposed to hundreds of thousands of songs, and therefore have the all-important element of time to build up love for these songs.
In later years, I have found plenty of music that I love just as much, if not a lot more, than that of my teenage years, but the power of these songs is diminished because I now have so much more I can listen to. This is both a product of the digital music era, and my continued interest in acquiring new music.
For the average listener, I wonder if it’s more accurate because your teenage years are a time where you care about music, and use it as a way to define who you are. When you get older, and have a job and maybe a family and other, more varied interests, it falls to the background, and doesn’t inspire as great a connection.
So yeah, science is great and I love that there are solid theories for all of this, but I think it might be more complicated than that. Or maybe more simple? I’m not even sure I know the difference here.

worldcafe:

Ever wonder why you love the music of your teenage years the most? 

Great article from Slate explaining the neural science and social reasons why we all feel the way we do. 

The nostalgia that accompanies our favorite songs isn’t just a fleeting recollection of earlier times; it’s a neurological wormhole that gives us a glimpse into the years when our brains leapt with joy at the music that’s come to define us.

I like everything about this except for the part where no one talks about how during those years you haven’t yet been exposed to hundreds of thousands of songs, and therefore have the all-important element of time to build up love for these songs.

In later years, I have found plenty of music that I love just as much, if not a lot more, than that of my teenage years, but the power of these songs is diminished because I now have so much more I can listen to. This is both a product of the digital music era, and my continued interest in acquiring new music.

For the average listener, I wonder if it’s more accurate because your teenage years are a time where you care about music, and use it as a way to define who you are. When you get older, and have a job and maybe a family and other, more varied interests, it falls to the background, and doesn’t inspire as great a connection.

So yeah, science is great and I love that there are solid theories for all of this, but I think it might be more complicated than that. Or maybe more simple? I’m not even sure I know the difference here.

post tags: science music reading year of reblogs