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"What really matters is what you like, not what you are like… Books, records, films — these things matter."
— High Fidelity

Posts on: television


»CBS to offer subscription streaming service as well

popculturebrain:

Of all the networks to take this jump next, CBS would have been the last I’d expected. The $5.99/month service will allow you to live stream CBS and their shows. 

I feel like if every network does this, if you want them all (or over 10 let’s say) that could end up being more expensive than a cable package.

The future of television is coming sooner than we thought.

entertainmentweekly:

ON THE FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF ITS AIRING, ‘BREAKING BAD’S EMMY-WINNING TEAM SPILLS THE SECRETS ON ‘OZYMANDIAS.’

Still one of the great TV episodes of our time.

Dave Grohl would be really pretentious if he wasn’t so unbridled in his enthusiasm for everything he does. He’s always so wide-eyed that you can’t help but drop your cynicism and go a long for the ride. This show/album could (should?) be a lot of fun.

funnyordie:

13 GIFs of Perfectly Timed TV Graphics
WARNING: This post contains graphic elements.

Not just perfectly timed, but perfectly located. This meme is gold.

»The TiVo Remote's Untold Past, Present and Future

parislemon:

When I posted my remote control rant the other day, Doug Harris pointed me to this great Christopher Mascari post from 2008 detailing the history of TiVo’s remote. One anecdote:

The designers were adamant about keeping the remote’s button layout as simple as possible. But with the DVR’s numerous features, the designers needed to create lots of extra buttons. To keep things straight, each button needed to have a distinctive feel, giving the ability to control the remote without even looking at it, which Newby described as a “key Braille-ability” surprisingly helped by the “blank finger parking spots between keys” that were equally important.

I owned a (second generation) TiVo and I can confirm that it did indeed have a brilliant remote. Nearly everything about it felt perfect. So I could not be less shocked to learn how much thought and care went into the creation of that remote.

And naturally, TiVo’s big-name television manufacturing partners hated it.

The remote control is at least 40% of the reason I still have a Tivo instead of the usual cable box.

comedycentral:

It’s Nathan Fielder’s most grande plan yet. The Dumb Starbucks episode of Nathan For You premieres tomorrow at 10:30/9:30c.

Really excited for this episode.

paulftompkins:

WHO SAYS I CAN’T PLAY DOGS? I CAN PLAY DOGS!

August 22nd on Netflix.

Um, what is going on with this show!? Also, this has great vocal talent. Count me in.

No banter = time saved, but also, no banter = what’s the point?

comedycentral:

Nathan Fielder’s Awkward Moment

Despite Fielder’s flat affect and seemingly limitless collection of crisp oxford shirts, Nathan for You tends to be jazzy and anarchic. Plots unfold in a linear fashion, each new piece of information a trapdoor. In an episode from the show’s second season, he approaches a real estate agent with a plan to market her properties as “100 percent ghost- and demon-free.” With the uneasy grace of someone trying not to hurt someone else’s feelings, she agrees. Part of this, of course, means hiring a medium to canvass the agent’s listings for supernatural activity. The medium wanders the rooms, metaphysical antennae up, shooting ominous glances into empty hallways and corners. Fielder and the agent — a genial woman named Sue — follow. The moment is hot with possibility.
In the bedroom, a tremor comes over the medium, and he announces his discovery: “an incubus” — or, more specifically, “a ghost that will have sex with you until you die.” The real estate agent, who until this point has seemed like she has better things to do with her time, says she knows what the medium means. It reminds her of a ghost she met many years ago in Switzerland. A violent ghost that grabbed her by the throat and choked her.


Eminently watchable.

comedycentral:

Nathan Fielder’s Awkward Moment

Despite Fielder’s flat affect and seemingly limitless collection of crisp oxford shirts, Nathan for You tends to be jazzy and anarchic. Plots unfold in a linear fashion, each new piece of information a trapdoor. In an episode from the show’s second season, he approaches a real estate agent with a plan to market her properties as “100 percent ghost- and demon-free.” With the uneasy grace of someone trying not to hurt someone else’s feelings, she agrees. Part of this, of course, means hiring a medium to canvass the agent’s listings for supernatural activity. The medium wanders the rooms, metaphysical antennae up, shooting ominous glances into empty hallways and corners. Fielder and the agent — a genial woman named Sue — follow. The moment is hot with possibility.

In the bedroom, a tremor comes over the medium, and he announces his discovery: “an incubus” — or, more specifically, “a ghost that will have sex with you until you die.” The real estate agent, who until this point has seemed like she has better things to do with her time, says she knows what the medium means. It reminds her of a ghost she met many years ago in Switzerland. A violent ghost that grabbed her by the throat and choked her.

Eminently watchable.

»On this weekend in 1984

jkottke:

On this weekend 30 years ago, in the summer of 1984, you could stroll into a movie theater and choose between the following films:

Ghostbusters
Gremlins
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
The Karate Kid
Star Trek III: The Search for Spock
Top Secret!
The Natural
Police Academy

Plus,…

More of this, please.

»On this weekend in 1974

jkottke:

Chinatown Listing 1984

Yesterday, I did a round-up of movies, TV, and music available on this weekend in 1984. As a comparison, I thought looking at the same weekend from 1974 would be interesting. Tracking this information down was a little more difficult than with 1984, but I found most of what I needed in

This is too much fun.

The Internet Has a ‘Louie’ Problem

The most radical part of Louie’s fourth season had nothing to do with its experiments with form and everything to do with the way it sank into untidiness and never once prescribed an easy way to climb back out again.

Louie is essential viewing because while you can never quite pin down what this show is—is it a sitcom? a series of short (and not-so-short) films? an extended commentary on the inherent messiness of emotional connection?—it remains wholly unique and entirely consistent in its vision.

The Internet Has a ‘Louie’ Problem

The most radical part of Louie’s fourth season had nothing to do with its experiments with form and everything to do with the way it sank into untidiness and never once prescribed an easy way to climb back out again.

Louie is essential viewing because while you can never quite pin down what this show is—is it a sitcom? a series of short (and not-so-short) films? an extended commentary on the inherent messiness of emotional connection?—it remains wholly unique and entirely consistent in its vision.

Why Are 23.4 Million People Watching The Big Bang Theory?

TV shows are not supposed to be this popular, not in the age of DVRs, Netflix, and cord-cutting. Nevertheless, CBS’s The Big Bang Theory—an old-fashioned multi-camera comedy about four nerdy men and three women who tolerate them—is not only television’s No. 1 show but also the highest-rated sitcom since Friends signed off in 2004. Here’s why.

Vulture tries to answer this question, and I’m not sure they can come up with a good reason, despite a bunch of nice quotes and graphics. I mean, can anyone explain why Bon Jovi is popular? Sometimes these things just happen.

Why Are 23.4 Million People Watching The Big Bang Theory?

TV shows are not supposed to be this popular, not in the age of DVRs, Netflix, and cord-cutting. Nevertheless, CBS’s The Big Bang Theory—an old-fashioned multi-camera comedy about four nerdy men and three women who tolerate them—is not only television’s No. 1 show but also the highest-rated sitcom since Friends signed off in 2004. Here’s why.

Vulture tries to answer this question, and I’m not sure they can come up with a good reason, despite a bunch of nice quotes and graphics. I mean, can anyone explain why Bon Jovi is popular? Sometimes these things just happen.